Plano, Texas

Plano was named the 3rd 'Best Place to Live in America by Money Magazine

 

Plano is a city in the U.S. state of Texas, located twenty miles northeast of downtown Dallas. The city is a part of the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area and lies mostly within Collin County, but includes a small portion that extends into Denton County.

It offers an affluent and yet affordable living. It has low taxes, housing prices and unemployment compared to most metros in the U.S. The Plano Independent School District is nationally regarded and provides an education comparable in quality to many top private schools.  The city offers many amenities which enhance the lives of residents and visitors by offering outstanding parks, trails and facilities, a variety of enriching programs, special events and activities that contribute to the health, well-being and quality of life within the city.

J.C. Penney, Pizza Hut, Frito-Lay, Toyota, and Rent-A-Center are all headquartered in Plano. Several technology giants have major R&D operations here including Ericsson, Intel Security, CA, Intuit and Nokia. These companies attract highly skilled workers from throughout the US and abroad.

 

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History

European settlers came to the area near present-day Plano in the early 1840s. Facilities such as a sawmill, a gristmill, and a store soon brought more people to the area. A mail service was established, and after rejecting several names for the nascent town (including naming it in honor of then-President Millard Fillmore), residents suggested the name Plano (from the Spanish word for “flat”), as a reference to the local terrain, unvaried and devoid of any trees. The name was accepted by the post office.

In 1872, the completion of the Houston and Central Texas Railway helped the city to grow, and it was incorporated in 1873. By 1874, the population had grown to more than 500. In 1881, a fire raged through the business district, destroying most of the buildings. The town was rebuilt and business again flourished through the 1880s. Also in 1881, the city assumed responsibility for what would eventually become Plano Independent School District (PISD), ending the days of it being served only by private schools.

At first, the population grew slowly, reaching 1,304 in 1900, and rising to 3,695 in 1960. By 1970, it began to feel some of the boom its neighbors had experienced after World War II. A series of public works projects and a change in taxes that removed the farming community from the town helped increase the overall population. In 1970, the population reached 17,872, and by 1980, it had exploded to 72,000. Sewers, schools and street development kept pace with this massive increase, largely because of  the city’s flat topography, grid layout and planning initiatives.

During the 1980s, many large corporations moved their headquarters to the city, including J. C. Penney and Frito-Lay, which encouraged further growth. By 1990, the population reached 128,713, dwarfing the county seat of McKinney. In 1994, the city was recognized as an All-America City. By 2000, the population grew to 222,030, making it one of Dallas’ largest suburbs. Plano is surrounded by other municipalities and therefore cannot expand in area, and there is little undeveloped land remaining within the city limits. However, as of July 2012, one large tract of land was being developed. Turnpike Commons at the intersection of Renner Rd and the George Bush Turnpike (bordered also by Shiloh Rd to the east). The development is expected to feature apartments, medical facilities, restaurants, a Race Trac gas station, and a hotel.

There was an epidemic of heroin abuse among young people in the 1990s. The Plano authorities created an anti-drug campaign with the name “Operation Rockfest”.

In 2013, Plano received top-scoring nationally in a livability index according to an algorithm created by AreaVibes.com, a Toronto-based company specializing in such data. The chart can be found here Best Places to Live in America. AreaVibes ranked the city at the top of the list of U.S. cities with populations between 100,000 and 10,000,000. Another chart, Best Places to Live in 2013, also has Plano ranked number 1. In September 2017, a mass shooting occurred where 9 people were killed.

 

Plano Parks and Recreation

The nationally accredited Plano Parks & Recreation Department is a key contributor of the city’s reputation as a city of excellence. Parks and Recreation enhances the lives of residents and visitors by offering outstanding parks, trails and facilities, a variety of enriching programs, special events and activities that contribute to the health, well-being and quality of life within the city. Register for classes and check out the Plano Recreation catalog to find out about upcoming classes, programs and events.
Plano Parks & Recreation Department is a key contributor of the city’s reputation as a city of excellence. Parks and Recreation enhances the lives of residents and visitors by offering outstanding parks, trails and facilities, a variety of enriching programs, special events and activities that contribute to the health, well-being and quality of life in the city. Register for classes and check out the Plano Recreation catalog to find out about upcoming classes, programs and events.

 

Schools

Three school districts serve residents in Plano:

Frisco Independent School District
5515 Ohio Drive
Frisco, TX 75034
Ph: 469-633-6000

Lewisville Independent School District
1800 Timbercreek Road
Flower Mound, TX 75028
Ph: 469-713-5200

Plano Independent School District
2700 W. 15th Street

Plano, TX 75075

Ph: 469-752-8100

 

Plano Homes for Sale

In 2017 Plano homes were sold from around $120,000 to more than $4M.  This includes homes that were sold as distressed properties.  Homes priced at $250,000 and under made only about 16% of all Plano homes that were sold in 2017.

Data as of November 2017 showed that Plano home price continues to increase from $315,000 in November 2016 to $345,750 in November 2017.  There is no home under $100k, and most homes are in the price range between $301k – $500k. Average days on the market is less than a month for homes $300k and under, about two months for homes between $310k – $750k and less than 3 months for homes  $751k and up.

 

Plano Homes under $250,000

Homes under $250,000 is extremely high in demand.  The following are subdivisions that may have homes under $250,000.  This is general information and can be used as a guide but not the ultimate guide for finding Plano homes under $250,000.

Briarwood Estates

Park Forest

Hunters Landing

Los Rios

Dallas North Estates

Woodhaven

Russell Creek

Preston Ridge

Cross Creek

Russell Creek

Royal Oaks

Cimarron

Ridgewood

Town West

Plano East
Armstrong Park

Plano Park

 

Plano Homes between $251,000 – $400,000

The following are subdivisions that may have homes between $251,000 to $400,000.  This is general information and can be used as a guide but not the ultimate guide for finding Plano homes between $250,000 – $400,000.

Audubon Place

Biltmore Swim and Racquet Club

Briarmeade

Briarwood Estates

Bristol Pointe

Bunker Hill

Chase Oaks

Cloisters

Country Place

Covington Square

Crestwood

Cross Creek

Custer Creek Estates

Dallas North Estates

Deerfield

Estates of Fountain Creek

Fairfield of Plano

Fairways of Ridgeview

Forest Creek North

Fountain Ridge

Greenhollow Estates

Harvestwood

Hickory Ridge

High Place

Highlands North

Highlands of Russell Park

Hills of Spring Creek

Hudson Heights

Hunters Gate

Hunters Glen

Hunters Landing

Hunters Ridge

Huntington Park

Independence Square

Kemper Estates

Kimberlea

Knolls at Russell Creek

Legacy Hills

Los Rios

Merriman Estates

Northwood

Oak Point Estates

Oakwood Glen

Park Blvd Estates

Park Forest

Park Hollow

Park Ridge

Parkdale

Parker Road Estate

Pasquinellis

Pitman Creek

Ports Ocall

Post Oaks Estates

Prairie Creek

Preston Cove

Preston Hollow

Preston Meadow

Preston Ridge

Preston Square

Preston View

Prestondale

Quail Creek

Ridgeview Park

Ridgeview Ranch

Ridgeview Villas

River Bend

Royal Oaks

Russell Creek

Santa Fe Estates

Spring Bend

Spring Creek Parkway Estates

Spring Ridge

Stone Creek

Stonehaven

Stonetree

Stoney Hollow

The Hills at Prestonwood

Thunderbird Estates

Timber Brook

Timbercreek Estates

Town West

The Trails

University Estates

Village at Legacy

Villages of Preston Glen

Villages of Russell Creek

Wellington at Preston Meadows

Wellington Run

Wentworth

West Creek Estates

Whiffletree

Williamsburg Square

Woodhaven

Woodlands of Plano

Woods at Russell Creek

Wyndemere

 

 

Plano Homes between $401,000 – $600,000

The following are subdivisions that may have homes between $401,000 to $600,000.  This is general information and can be used as a guide but not the ultimate guide for finding Plano homes between $401,000 – $600,000.

 

Beverly Hills Estates

Briarmeadow

Cambridge Place At Russell Creek

Carriage Hill

Castlemere

Chase Oaks

Covington Square

Cross Creek

Crystal Creek

Dearfield

Estates at Wooded Cove

Estates of Forest Creek

Fairfax Hill

Fairways of Gleneagles

Forest Creek Estates

Forest Creek North

Glen Heather

Glenhollow Estates

Harrington Homeplace

Hickory Ridge

Highland Ridge

Highlands of Preston Ridge

Highlands of Russell Park

Hills at Prestonwood

Hudson Heights

Hunters Creek Estates

Hunters Glen

Hunters Landing

Huntingdon Green

Kings Ridge

Knolls at Russell Creek

Merriman Estates

Northridge Estates

Oakwood Glen

Old Shepherd Place

Parkbrooke

Parkway Estates

Parkway Heights

Pitman Creek Estates

Prairie Creek Estates

Preston Hollow

Preston Lakes

Preston Meadow

Quincy Place

Ridgeview Park

Ridgeview Ranch

Royal Oaks

Shepherds Glen

Shoal Creek

Spring Ridge

Steeplechase

Stone Lake Estates

Stonewood Glen

Stoney Hollow

The Hills at Prestonwood

Trails of Glenwood

Villages of Preston Meadow

Village of White Rock Creek

Wellington at Preston Meadows

Wentworth

Westover Estates

Whiffletree

Willow Bend

Windhaven

Windsor Park

Wolf Creek Estates

Wyndham Hill

 

Plano Homes $601,000 and up

The following are subdivisions that may have homes from $601,000 and up.  This is general information and can be used as a guide but not the ultimate guide for finding Plano homes  $601,000 and up.

 

 

If you are considering relocating to Plano or if you have any further questions about the area feel free to connect with me.

 

 

 

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